Saturday, May 25, 2013

Cross-Pollination


Many a sage has opined on the value of cross-pollination as a marketing tool, so I decided to try it out.  I’ve been reading Joe Konrath’s blog for more than a year, as well as about twenty other blogs on a daily basis.  And one bit of wisdom I’ve encountered again and again is that the best marketing device for your current book is probably your next book.

In my recent posts, I’ve been discussing my ebook The Mummies of Blogspace9, and my frustrations with finding readers.  Since then, Mummies hasn’t exactly taken off, but when I look at my sales numbers, I can definitely see that I’ve sold more copies of my other titles.  I have ten titles on Amazon now, which can be viewed on my Author Central page.  And as the ball gets moving (it's barely budging), I hope the synergy will propel sales.

Why?  I don’t know.  Maybe its because once people start paying a little bit of attention to you, they start paying more attention to you.  Maybe too, it’s because I’ve aggressively promoted my books in each new book.  The Mummies of Blogspace9 has twenty hotlinks that will take you to my Amazon author page, my blog, my website, and directly to my Amazon Author Central page.  You cannot get through Mummies without learning about American Caliphate.  

So I got to thinking -- one other frequent bit of blog wisdom I’ve come across is that nonfiction is a much easier sell than fiction.  And that never did much for me because I’m a mystery writer at heart, and I don’t want to start writing nonfiction.  BUT, I have been working on a little back-burner project for about three years, and I thought maybe it was time to bring it to the front burner, or maybe even microwave it into fruition.  So I did.

I’ve been a college professor for fourteen years now, and I’ve learned a lot about college, so I’ve been feeling it was high time to write a book about college.  Well, here it is.  If you have any loved ones about to take that trip to college, please consider picking up a copy of How to Do College Right.

And just in case you’re wondering - no, you won’t be able to read through it without hearing about my mystery novels.  And the hotlinks will take you directly to my webpage.  You could have yourself a copy of Grave Indulgence or American Caliphate in no time.

Will this experiment in cross-pollination work?  You can guess I’ll keep you posted.  And if you keep reading, I’ll tell you a little bit about How to Do College Right.




The secrets of college success have been passed down from professor to professor for many centuries. Now, for the first time, these secrets are revealed!

How to Do College Right is a guidebook, providing essential insights on how to navigate the foreign land of college. Without a guidebook, a traveler might wander around for a long time, missing out on some important landmarks, or wasting money by focusing on the wrong things. A student can just as easily wander through a couple years of college without accomplishing much. And that can prove costly. 

Other than the purchase of a home, a college education is the biggest expense that most American families have. With tuition at some colleges approaching $50,000 per year, a four-year education can cost $200,000. Most people don’t think twice about consulting a realtor or a lending consultant before buying a house. They want to be sure that their investment is sound. But those same people will shell out a great deal of money for college tuition without making sure it’s well spent. 

How to Do College Right can help you make the most of your college experience by laying bare some of the expectations that guide professors in educating and evaluating students. College is hard; it’s meant to be. And it’s easy to screw up. I’m a professor. I know what it takes to succeed in college, to make the most of it, and to graduate fully prepared to take the next steps in life. 

And I’ve seen too many students who don’t make it, students who have the ability to succeed but fail anyway, or otherwise waste their time. College is a program of expectations, and you would be wise to learn the rules that underlie those expectations. It doesn’t matter if you’re rich or poor, or if you’re headed to the Ivy League or to the local community college. This is an important stage of your life, and you have to treat it as such. 

The secrets revealed in this book can help you make the most of your college experience.

For more information, please visit www.williamdoonan.com

18 comments:

Charles Gramlich said...

I've done two straight nonfiction books, one that we use in our writing in psychology class. Unfortunately, no other university has picked it up so sales have been pretty meager.

Eugenia O'Neal said...

Interesting! I wish you much success with it. Getting high schoolers and their parents to know about it will be key but I think it can do well. Advertising or promotions on websites targeted at those audiences might help.

Julie Luek said...

I've seen similiar premises on some sites offering a free book or download. I hope this takes off for you. As for the subject, I spent over 20 years in higher ed directing a learning canter, trying to equip students with skills on how to succeed in college. I hope your book sells like the wind!

William Doonan said...

Thanks guys! I think it's a cool book. I've seen students make the same mistakes over and over again, and I thought some insights from a professor might help.

jrlindermuth said...

It works for bees. Here's hoping it gives your books some buzz.

William Doonan said...

Thanks, John. I'm crossing my fingers that I can avoid colony collapse.

Jewel Amethyst said...

I hope it sells, William. I think you may increase sales if you market it to high school counselors even if only a few in your area. Or when your university has open house or even include it as part of the freshman package that could impact sales. Or maybe if you can get your university to link to it on its webpage specifically in the admissions or new students or so section. Just a few suggestions.

William Doonan said...

Jewel,

Would that it could be! Great idea. I'd be drawn and quartered by the administration for trying to personally gain from my connections. I could try to make it free, but that wouldn't really get me anywhere.

C.L. Swinney said...

This seems like a good idea. Your perseverance with marketing will pay off. I hope you keep at it because your writing is fantastic.

marja said...

Terrific idea, William, and one I think I'll have to try. Very interesting post. Thank you for sharing your ideas and wisdom. : )
Marja McGraw

William Doonan said...

Thanks CL, and thanks Marja. I'm still blogging regularly, but I wanted to see if I could drum up some other ideas. I'll keep you posted!

Lesley Diehl said...

The nonfiction book sounds great. As a retired college professor I can appreciate your wanting to share your insights with students, and I think you're right on the money...Or perhaps will be soon. I'm really curious if this marketing approach works. Please keep us posted.

Liane Spicer said...

Good luck, William! I'll get it for my niece who just graduated high school.

john M. Daniel said...

Bill, I'm in awe of your elbow grease and your thinking cap. Here's wishing your every innovative new literary project much success!

William Doonan said...

Thanks, Liane. Let me know what she thinks!

John, thanks for the good will!

John Brantingham said...

You're doing great William and I think your efforts will really pay off. In general, I believe that the more we do in one field the better we do in another. Everything feeds everything else.

William Doonan said...

Thanks, John! That's exactly what I'm hoping for.

James R. Callan said...

Enjoyed it, William. And I certainly believe in cross-pollination. It's worked for others - it will work for you. My trouble is, I'm impatient. I'll be happy to know how your experiment works out. And should I find something that works, I'll let you know also.

jim